Thursday, November 28, 2019

2019 Delicious Reads - Books We Read

You've been asking and I'm finally getting around to announcing our Delicious Reads 2019 book club list! 

2019 Delicious Reads Book Club Books Monthly


A little background into how we pick our books...
We've found that it's easiest if we pick all our books for the year at once. There are always so many good books to pick from and it's easy to pick 12. What’s hard is trying to ONLY pick 12 lol!

We go through several rounds of voting before we finalize our selection and we do our best to pick books that are diverse in genre, characters, and story. 

We always pick at least:
1 Classic
1 Historical Fiction
1 Non-Fiction
1 Middle Grade
1 Halloween Read
The rest of our books are usually a mix of Young Adult and General Fiction picks. 🤔Which books on our 2019 list have you read or which ones do you want to read? I'd love to hear your thoughts on our lineup! 

JANUARY: Muse of Nightmares
By Laini Taylor

FEBRUARY: A Monster Calls
By Patrick Ness

MARCH: Circe
By Madeline
APRIL: The Three Musketeers
By Alexandre Dumas

MAY: Before We Were Yours
By Lisa Wingate

JUNE: The Princess Bride
By William Goldman

JULY: Little Fires Everywhere
By Celeste Ng

AUGUST: Educated: A Memoir
By Tara Westover

SEPTEMBER: The Handmaids Tale
By Margaret Atwood

OCTOBER: The Lost Queen
By Signe Pike

NOVEMBER: The Bear and the Nightingale
By Katherine Arden

DECEMBER: Wishtree
By Katherine Applegate

#bookclubofinstagram #bookclub #deliciousreads #bookclubreads

3 comments :

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